Saturday Savings: More histories, more mysteries

Endeavour Press discounted two biographies of Queen Victoria and one of Prince Albert, her husband, today (Saturday, 10 September 2016):

victoria1Queen Victoria, compiled by the queen’s librarian, was written to celebrate her Diamond Jubilee in 1897 and relies on the queen’s own notes. Richard Rivington Holmes provides contemporary insight into the queen, her peers, her background and her heirs. He also explores her lineage and how she came to inherit the throne and rule the British Empire. It’s on sale today for 99 cents (USD), a significant savings from the print list price of $25.95 (hardbound) or $26.95 (paperback). Sir Richard Rivington Holmes (1835-1911) was a British archivist and courtier, best known for being Librarian to the Queen at Windsor Castle. He was reappointed this role in 1901 by King Edward VII. He is also well known for his large Ethiopian artefact collection that has been catalogued into the British museum. Holmes is buried in Buckinghamshire.

A second Jubilee memoir, Victoria, Queen and Empresswas also written tovictoria2 celebrate 50 years of rule. G. Holden Pike received access to Victoria’s diaries to pen his biography.  It, too, has been discounted to 99 cents (USD), from a list price of $22.95 (hardbound). Holden Pike covers topics such as the Queen’s education, through to Prince Albert’s death, and finally to the Golden Jubilee, alongside other contextually relevant aspects of the Victorian era. Godfrey Holden Pike (1836-1910) was the sub-editor of The Sword and The Trowel for twenty years. He contributed many articles to the magazine, alongside penning many historical and biographical works such as Oliver Cromwell and His Times, and From Slave to College President.

albertHector Bolitho, the renowned biographer of royals, tackles Victoria’s husband in Albert, Prince ConsortThis one is also on sale for 99 cents (USD) today. Bolitho explores the life and personality of Prince Albert, from his birth in Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, his marriage and restraining influence on Queen Victoria and his early death from typhoid.

Earlier this week, Lea Wait’s Shadows on a Morning in Mainethe eighth in her Antique Print Mystery series, was released. It’s available for $4.99 (USD). (See my Sister Sites page for more info on Lea’s website.) I’m really, really, really ready to escape from the unrelenting heat and humidity of the Gulf Coast, so a virtual vacation to Maine sounds perfect.

shadowsDescription: Antique print dealer Maggie Summer’s making big changes in her life. She’s taken a sabbatical from her college teaching job and moved to the coast of Maine to run an antique mall with Will Brewer, her significant other, and is finally hoping to adopt the daughter she’s been hoping for. However, the troubled girl referred to her doesn’t want any part of the plan, showing affection only for harbor seals, which remind her of her “real mother.” Maggie’s distraught when someone starts shooting the seals — and the a young fisherman is murdered. When Will then confesses a secret from his past, she begins to wonder if moving to Maine is the biggest mistake of her life.

R. Allen Chappell has been compared to Tony Hillerman — which is recommendation enough for any mystery fan. His Navajo Autumn is discounted to 99 cents (USD) today from $2.99. I read a sample, enough to make me want to read more.

Description: Thomas Begay is found dead-drunk under the La Plata Bridge …not unusual for Thomas Begay. What is unusual, is BIA investigator Patsy Greyhorse, found lying beside him …not drunk, or even a Navajo, but very dead nonetheless. Long time friend Charlie Yazzi, fresh from law school, risks his career …and even his life to help his old schoolmate. The Answer seems to lie with the Yeenaaldiooshii …should one choose to believe in such things. In the far reaches of the reservation there still are traditional Navajos living their lives with few concessions to modern mores. Guided by their strong sense of cultural heritage these outliers remain a strong anchor for the Navajo Nation. This story follows the lives of such people, caught up in a plot that could have far-reaching implications for the entire tribe.

Saturday Savings 03.09.2016

Histories, mysteries and more . . .

Labor Day weekend brings an end, for some, to summer, and the beginning, to others, of college football season. Mister Sister and I spent the last few days giving our house a much-needed deep cleaning as we get ready for Game Day celebrations. I’m ready to relax (after the game, of course) with some good books. Here’s what I’ve found on sale today:

TitanicWalter Lord’s account of the Titanic disaster earned him a reputation for meticulously researched literary non-fiction. Open Road Media brings his A Night to Remember and The Night Lives On, which examines factual and fanciful theories surrounding the ship and its sinking, in The Complete Titanic Chronicles, discounted today to $4.99 (USD) — $20 off its list price!

Endeavour Press offers the sensational and best-selling history from Lord Russell of Liverpool of Nazi war crimes, detailing the illegal as well as immoralScourge atrocities committed against Germany’s own citizens, prisoners of war and others.  Lord Russell of Liverpool—né Edward Frederick Langley Russell, 2nd Baron Russell of Liverpool—was Deputy Judge Advocate General for the British Army of the Rhine, and was a chief legal adviser for Britain during the war crimes trials following World War II. The Scourge of the Swastika, his history of those crimes, is on sale today for $1.99 (USD), down from $14.99 (USD).

Mysterious Press discounts Aaron Elkins’ fourth Gideon Oliver mystery, Old Boneswhich won the Edgar Award and which was voted one of 100 Favorite Mysteries of the 20th Century by the Independent Booksellers Association, to $1.99 (USD) from $7.99.

BonesBook description: With the roar of thunder and the speed of a galloping horse comes the tide to Mont St. Michel goes the old nursery song. So when the aged patriarch of the du Rocher family falls victim to the perilous tide, even the old man’s family accepts the verdict of accidental drowning. But too quickly, this “accident” is followed by a bizarre discovery in the ancient du Rocher château: a human skeleton, wrapped in butcher paper, beneath the old stone flooring. Professor Gideon Oliver, lecturing on forensic anthropology at nearby St. Malo, is asked to examine the bones. He quickly demonstrates why he is known as the “Skeleton Detective,” providing the police with forensic details that lead them to conclude that these are the remains of a Nazi officer believed to have been murdered in the area during the Occupation. Or are they? Gideon himself has his doubts. Then, when another of the current du Rochers dies—this time via cyanide poisoning—his doubts solidify into a single certainty: someone wants old secrets to stay buried . . . and is perfectly willing to eradicate the meddlesome American to make that happen.

I love Rudyard Kipling’s stories, and Kim, the classic story of an orphaned boy, a lama and two empires clashing over one magical land, is free today, thanks to Open Road Media.

Lambert & Hook return for Final Act

Kindle edition coming 1 September 2016
Kindle edition coming 1 September 2016

Recommended:  Final Act (Book 29 in the Lambert & Hook series) by J.M. Gregson; Kindle ebook scheduled for release 1 September 2016 from Severn House Publishers, Kindle pre-order price $15.33 (USD); hardbound edition now available, list price $28.99 (USD), current price $24.05 (USD).

A company of actors all but upstage the “real” detectives in Final Act, the latest mystery in J.M. Gregson’s long-running Lambert & Hook series.

Sam Jackson chews the scenery behind the scenes as the highly successful television producer pretending to be a Hollywood mogul – coarse in appearance, behavior and speech – until he’s found dead in his caravan in a break between shooting. Everyone on location, from his assistant to the star to the aging actor in a cameo role, has a reason to wish him dead, and Gregson focuses suspicion on each one equally, and convincingly.

Jackson himself is so repulsive that the reader won’t regret his demise. In fact, I enjoyed the mystery more once he was off stage, so to speak, and the other characters could take over. And they do take over, pushing Detective Chief Superintendent Lambert and Detective Sergeant Hook out of the limelight and into supporting roles for their 29th appearance.

The series began in 1989 with Murder at the Nineteenth. That one, alas, alack, is not available for Kindle, but many of the earlier ones have been re-released by Endeavour Press. I’ve picked up several at discounts, though they are still a bargain at anything from 99 cents to $3.99 (USD). The list price on Final Act is much higher, and much higher than many of the U.S. mysteries. The quality is also higher.

Gregson writes well. The characters are fully fleshed. Even when they are the stock characters of drama – the national treasure with a knighthood, the Page Three girl with a plunging neckline, the good-looking gay with a house-husband – they aren’t stereotypical shortcuts or social statements. The story demands them, and Gregson provides them. He also provides a satisfying puzzle. Until the very end, it seems as though anyone could be the killer. But at the very end, it seems that only one could ever have been suspected.

What more can a mystery reader expect?

NOTE:  Sis received a complimentary advanced reading copy from Severn House via NetGalley, for which she is grateful. Neither attempted to influence her review.

Description:  Sam Jackson is not a man who suffers fools – or anyone else – gladly. A successful British television producer who fancies himself as a Hollywood mogul, he makes enemies easily, and delights in the fact. It is no great surprise that such a man should meet a violent death. Detective Chief Superintendent Lambert and Detective Sergeant Hook deduce that the person who killed him is almost certainly to be found among the company of actors who are shooting a series of detective mysteries in rural Herefordshire. But these are people who make a living by acting out other people’s fictions, people more at home with make-believe than real life – and the two detectives find interrogating them a difficult business. How can Lambert and Hook fight their way to the truth when faced with a cast of practised deceivers?

About the author:  J.M. Gregson, a Lancastrian by birth and upbringing, was a teacher for twenty-seven years before concentrating full-time on writing. He is the author of the popular Percy Peach and Lambert & Hook series, and has written books on subjects as diverse as golf and Shakespeare.

Readers who are reluctant to, or who refuse to, pay so much for ebooks may prefer to borrow this title from a lending library, but many of the titles in this series are quite affordable. Here are a few:

Description: Lydon Hall is, as the estate agent’s brochure puts it, a house full of character. But its many interesting features should surely not include a corpse in the elegant drawing-room? Is this death the suicide it appears to be? Superintendent John Lambert and Sergeant Bert Hook are brought in to investigate the tight-knit village community which houses Lydon hall. And everyone one they meet seems suspicious. From the glamorous French widow of the deceased to the man living rough on the moor they all seem to know more about this death than is at first apparent. Moreover, it gradually emerges that the staff of the estate agency he owned all had their different reasons for disliking the dead man…

‘Making a Killing’ is a chilling, expertly plotted mystery story and the second book in the Lambert and Hook Detective series.

The Fox in the Forest When the town vicar Peter Barton is found shot in the woods between two peaceful villages on Christmas Eve, Superintendent Lambert and his CID team are called in to investigate. His estranged wife herself was missing in the days before her husband’s death, busy with her lover. Could she be the killer Lambert is looking for? Or could it be the only man who seems to dislike the victim and owns a matching shotgun? Or the sweet local boy who travels through the woods every day? Then a second victim is found, again in the woods, again with a shotgun: a man they had held for 36 hours before. It seems that they have a serial killer on their hands, selecting victims at random, a killer who the papers are calling the ‘Fox’. With an endless list of potential suspects and no real evidence, Lambert struggles to find his culprit. The rural community closes in upon itself with secrets when another girl is attacked by the Fox and everyone seems to know the details of the two killings. Can Lambert and his team find a killer amongst the various townspeople with connections to the murders? More importantly, can they piece together the few clues they have to find the truth before another victim is found?


Is it time to join Prime?

Amazon.com celebrates Prime Day with savings

Today is Prime Day at Amazon.com, with deals in every department, and new ones added during the day, for customers who belong to Prime, the Amazon program that provides free two-day shipping (and even faster, for those who live close to an Amazon warehouse) plus other benefits.

Prime is a good deal, even a great deal, for some households, but not worth the expense for others.  I started with a free, 30-day trial — click on the offer below to get your own free trial — and I’ve renewed it some years and not others.

Today’s deals include a discount of 33.33 percent on the new 7-inch Kindle Fire for Prime members only:

Endeavour Press, which I have found to be a reliable publisher of previously out-of-print books as well as new releases, has a number of Prime Day deals, including this one from Alan Evans:Seek Out

November 1917. The First World War is on a knife-edge – and the British Empire in mortal danger. Commander David Cochrane Smith is about to embark on his most perilous adventure yet. The Imperial German Navy has sent Kapitan-zur-See Erwin Voss to command the mighty new battle cruiser Salzburg in the Adriatic. Smith is ordered by the Admiralty to find and attack her in harbour — a seemingly suicidal task which is made all the more hopeless when he runs into the opposition of his superiors in Venice. But it is a vital mission and Smith knows he must go it alone. Though the odds are stacked against him and his tiny crew, his orders are inflexible. Wipe out the enemy. Commanding three small torpedo boats, Smith finds himself relentlessly hunted as Voss and the Salzberg score victory after victory. Finally, Smith sees one last chance to avert all-out disaster – he stakes everything on one final attempt to seek out and destroy…

Saturday savings . . .

Flames over France

I love bargain books – they feed my need to read without breaking my budget – and I’ve picked up a number of first-rate reads for less than a dollar and several for nothing. I also love to share my finds with my friends, and I want to share them with my readers . . . which is easy when it’s a book I’ve already read but not so easy when it is a book I haven’t read because these offers are usually limited, often for a day or so. What a dilemma! So, here’s my solution:  I’ll try posting some, like this one, where I’ve only read a sample but which are offered by publishers that I have found to be reliable or are recommended by others I have found to be reliable, when I can’t find one I have read and can recommend.

Let me know what you think.  Your feedback will help me decide whether to make this a regular feature or to stick with reviewing books I have had time to read and review.

Flames over FranceFlames over France by Robert Jackson, 224 pp.; Kindle edition published by Endeavour Press in 2016; originally published by Severn House in 1997.  Endeavour’s 99-cent Deal of the Week (99 pence in the UK).

Book description:  May 1940: Flight Lieutenant Ken Armstrong is deployed to an airfield in France. His arrival coincides with Hitler’s invasion of France and the Low Countries. He picks up victory after victory but nothing he can do will be enough to turn the tide. Armstrong befriends the pilots he fights beside but is forced to watch them drop out of the sky each day. The battle for France will be lost. But that doesn’t mean the war is over. Armstrong and his men are determined to fight tooth and nail against impossible odds. In this tale of dignity and bravery when all hope seems lost, Armstrong must do what needs to be done. As a former pilot and Squadron Leader himself, Robert Jackson masters the plot and brings history to life in fantastic detail. This is the second novel to feature the charismatic Flight Lieutenant Ken Armstrong, following on from Flames over Norway.

Endeavour Press is an independent digital publisher in the United Kingdom, and, while not every book published coincides with Sis’s personal taste, she has found all of them to be well-written and well-edited. The publisher’s free weekly newsletter provides information on a variety of discounted and free ebooks each week.  Readers can sign up to receive the newsletter at www.endeavourpress.com.

About the Author:  Robert Jackson (b. 1941) is a prolific author of military and aviation history, having become a full-time writer in 1969. As an active serviceman in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve he flew a wide range of aircraft, ranging from jets to gliders.